Club drug Molly can lead to tragic accidents and harsh criminal penalties

A dangerous synthetic drug called Molly can lead to serious health consequences and harsh penalties. Charges of possession need to be taken seriously.

The popular club drug Molly is gaining attention from news outlets across the country. Most recently, the drug was allegedly connected to the death of concert goers at several music festivals. A recent report by USA Today dove into the issue, noting concert goers compare the spike in use of Molly to the surge of LSD in the 60s.

Unfortunately, those caught with Molly can face more than just dangerous consequences to their health. Enforcement officers are taking use of drugs like Molly seriously, and drug charges issued for the use of Molly or similar drugs can come with steep consequences.

More on Molly

Molly, also known as MDMA, Ecstasy, Disco Biscuit, Adam, beans, Clarity, Eve, Hug Drug and Lover's Speed, is a manmade drug often used in the club scene. In many cases, it is presented as a "pure" form of MDMA or Ecstasy, but the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reports that a large portion of the confiscated drug generally contains a mixture of other harmful substances. In fact, a sizable portion did not contain any MDMA at all. Instead the drug is often laced with methamphetamine, cocaine and ephedrine among others.

Molly generally looks like a colorful tablet and is most often taken orally. It can also be ground into a powder and inhaled or mixed with liquid and injected. Once taken, the user may claim to experience feelings of euphoria and increased sensitivity to touch. Others experience confusion and anxiety, depression and paranoia among other, negative side effects. These side effects can last for a few hours or weeks. Use can also lead to kidney, liver and heart failure.

Steep consequences

In addition to the dangerous effect this drug can have on one's health, harsh criminal consequences can also apply. MDMA is considered a Schedule I drug. The penalties connected to possession of a controlled substance in New York vary depending on the amount and other circumstances, including whether the substance was possessed with the intent to sell. Possession of even a small amount of Molly can lead to up to one year imprisonment as well as monetary fines and a criminal record.

A criminal record can make it difficult to find employment or housing, and even a minor drug conviction can lead to the loss of scholarships. Those who are charged with a drug crime need to take the charges seriously. Contact an experienced drug crimes defense lawyer to review your case and help better ensure that your legal rights are protected and that you receive a more favorable outcome.

Keywords: drug charges criminal defense